March 25

“Significant” Amount Of Toxic Waste From Ohio Train Derailment Heads To Baltimore

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The decision to transport a “significant” amount of toxic wastewater from the East Palestine, Ohio train derailment by rail to a wastewater treatment plant located east of Baltimore City, and eventually discharge it into the local water system, might spark outrage among residents.

Local media outlet WYPR obtained a letter from Contractor Clean Harbors of Baltimore Inc., which described itself as the “optimal wastewater treatment site to treat and discharge the wastewater collected from rainwater, collected water and stream water above and below the cleanup site of the Norfolk Southern Railroad derailment.”

Once the contractor obtains approval, the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Baltimore County is set to receive over 675,000 gallons of toxic water via rail transport (if you can believe it – by rail) — a fact that may concern Baltimore residents. The approval is expected to be granted imminently.

“The water would be pre-treated by a contractor then dumped into the city-controlled wastewater system then cleaned with the city’s Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Dundalk,” WYPR said.

Baltimore City Mayor Brandon Scott voiced concerns about the plan to treat the toxic water.

“Both the county executive and I have grave concerns about the waste from this derailment coming into our facilities and being discharged into our system.”

Scott added he wants additional testing to be conducted before the water is released from the plant and into the water system.

And we wonder what water system is near the plant. Perhaps it’s the Chesapeake Bay…

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